Househunters are gobsmacked over Georgian seven-bedroom pile on Perfect House, Secret Location 

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Viewers slammed a family of Londoners who said they wanted to buy a £800,000 seven-bed Georgian pile in Norfolk on last night's Perfect House, Secret Location.

Jimmy, 38, and Steffie McGeoghan, 37, from London,  were on the first episode of the programme tonight, as they joined presenter Steve Jones on the hunt for their dream home.

However, the twist of the show saw the family agreeing to get in the back of a blacked out van to be whisked off to four different dream properties in secret locations, which weren't revealed until the end of the show.

The couple were blown away by a seven-bedroom Georgian pile in Thetford in Norwich, despite the fact it was two and a half hours from their childhood neighbourhood of Brentford. 

However many of those watching were highly skeptical that the family understood the level of upkeep necessary in the huge property, with one writing: 'Lovely house but absolutely no mention of running and maintenance costs of large period property or amount of time cleaning and gardening.' 

Viewers slammed a family of Londoners who said they wanted to buy a £800,000 seven-bed Georgian pile in Norfolk on last night's Perfect House, Secret Location

Another commented: 'The maintenance and running costs for a house that big in Norfolk would bankrupt the family.'

Kicking off their property hunt, childhood sweethearts Jimmy and Steffie had lived in their mid terrace house in West London for the last 14 years.

They also lived with Steffie's mother Sibby, and their three children, all of whom were under 10.

Logistics worker Jimmy said he desperately wanted a working-from-home space, explaining: 'When I work from home I'm set up on that dining table and at 4.30pm no matter who you're talking to, the door opens and children run in. All that professional façade stops.

The couple were blown away by a seven-bedroom Georgian pile in Thetford in Norwich, despite the fact it was two and a half hours from their childhood neighbourhood of Brentford

'It would be nice to have some control of that actually.'

Assistant head teacher Steffie: 'During the pandemic when we were all at home, it made me feel like I was ready for a little bit less London and more space.

 'We only have one bathroom and it gets quite cramped in there.'

The couple had been lucky and the value of their home had skyrocketed since they bought it, giving them a budget of £750,000-£800,000 for their house hunt

In their dream home, they wanted an accessible bedroom and bathroom for Sibby, as well as a large garden, a home office and space for a growing family. 

And they confessed they wouldn't mind a serious relocation, with Sibby adding: ' I have no clue where we could go.' 

The first destination Steve wanted to show the family was on the coast, with the trio being asked to put blind folds on before exiting the blacked-out car.   

The first house was a £775,000 three story Victorian fronted semi which looked out onto an actual fronted bay in St Leonard's on Sea. 

However many of those watching were highly skeptical that the family understood the level of upkeep necessary in the huge property

The enormous home featured seven-bedrooms, many of which were decked out in luxurious and dark decor  

At 2700 sq ft, it had six bedrooms spread over three floors. It also had a large kitchen with a sunroom, four en-suite bathrooms and, it's crowning glory, the sitting room with breathtaking views. 

Meanwhile there was a  large dining room which could become a wheelchair accessible bedroom for Sibby. 

Jimmy said: 'It's got lots of character.'

Steffie explained: 'I think it's such a pretty house and to have a view like that and a beach we can walk to really quickly.   

Meanwhile Sibby added: 'I love it, it's really, really nice. There is nothing false or fake in here.'  

Many of those watching the programme questioned if the couple understood the level of upkeep the home would need 

Sitting down to discuss the property, Steffie said she wasn't sure about how overlooked the garden was from the other houses.  

One mystery property down and the family were back on the road, 

Londoner Steffie said: 'I can't see how you'll find a house accessible enough for Mum, a perfectly manicured lawn for Jimmy with access to a high street.'

The second property was the £700,000 Old Post Office in St Neats, a gorgeous family home with an outbuilding which could be converted into a granny annex for Sibby. 

The grandmother said: 'I like the look of that, it looks like a little Wendy house for Grandma.'

The house had five decent sized bedrooms and two sitting rooms, while ever inch as been magnificently modernised.

The huge kitchen immediately blew Steffie away, who said: 'I love the brick work and the colour of the units.'   

The first house the couple viewed on the programme was a £775,000 three story Victorian fronted semi which looked out onto an actual fronted bay in St Leonard's on Sea

At 2700 sq ft, it had six bedrooms spread over three floors and, it's crowning glory, the sitting room with breathtaking views (pictured) 

Each of the bedrooms was basked in sunshine in the gorgeous property, which was just a stone's throw from the beach 

The third property was actually in West London, just a stones throw from their current home.

A 1970s detached home, it had five comfortable sized bedrooms, and three attractive reception rooms, including a double aspect sitting room with French doors opening onto the garden.

It's just 30 minutes from their current home, and on the tube, while Heathrow was just six miles down the road. 

While it was on the market for £825,000, Steve said he thought the vendors could take an offer.

Steffie confessed: 'I think there's lots of great space here and it's really bright and really appealing.'

The final property was one Steve knew the family would never have considered if they knew where it was.

The £795,000 Georgian period property in Norfolk had seven bedrooms, three state of the art bathrooms and two offices. 

The second property was the £700,000 Old Post Office in St Neats, a gorgeous family home with an outbuilding which could be converted into a granny annex for Sibby

However the family were skeptical about the small size of several of the communal rooms (pictured, the living room) 

The huge kitchen immediately blew Steffie away, who said she 'loved the brick work and the colour of the units'

Meanwhile it even had an accessible annex which an ensuite which could be perfect for Sibby. 

There was even a wine cellar in the basement of the house.

Steffie said: 'Where we've come from...we've both grown up on council estates in smaller properties...Our house now isn't huge. 

'I've not allowed myself to think of us ion a house this big and with this many rooms. So I think I'm just trying to get used to the idea.' 

After touring the property, she confessed she was blown away, saying: 'I feel very privileged that we could maybe afford something this different from what we are used to.

The family confessed the beautiful Old Post Office was an attractive alternative to their cramped terrace in London 

'It's a beautiful house...except we don't know where it is.'    

Sitting down with Steve back in London, the couple quickly ruled out the house in West London and the beach home.

Meanwhile they said they'd be interested in viewing the Old Post office and the  Georgian Pile for a second time.

Steffie said:  'All day I've been thinking about it.' 

When Steve revealed the Georgian Pile was in Norfolk, the couple were left grimacing - but Steffie insisted they still wanted to see the home for a second time.  

The third property was actually in West London, just a stones throw from their current home (pictured) 

A 1970s detached home, it had five comfortable sized bedrooms (pictured), and three attractive reception rooms

She said: 'The Georgian Pile was so special, it can't come off the top spot. It's about properties not the location - I don't see any reason to change the thought process.' 

After a week or so to reflect, the couple decided the old post office in St Neatz wasn't the perfect house for them.

Jimmy said: 'Many plus points but it was just missing that communal family space.'

And they later learned an offer had been accepted on the Georgian Pile, with Steffie describing her disappointment.

She said: 'It was perfect for us, but the day of the revisit, it was sold.

'They accepted before we got back to revisit. There were tears.' 

But Jimmy confessed the process had still been worthwhile, adding: 'We've learned a lot in this process the right house is more important than the location. 

Half of Britons say the rapidly rising cost of living is now their biggest money concern - and a third will cut back on non-essentials like clothes and toys 

Britons now consider the rising cost of living as their biggest money concern.

Almost half are concerned about it, according to Aldermore Bank's latest savings tracker, which surveyed 4,000 UK adults.

Households currently face a perfect storm of financial strain from the forthcoming National Insurance contribution rise, jump in energy price cap and fuel costs, alongside bigger food shopping bills, and other bills rising with inflation.

These costs combined, would mean a worker earning £30,000 faces an additional cost burden of £1,128 a year from April, according to estimates by Interactive Investor.

One in five Britons are worried about not having adequate emergency funds in case of unexpected expenses, according to Aldermore.

A similar number are also mindful of health costs, while many are equally still worrying about the impact of Brexit on the economy.

Not being able to afford a good quality of life and not having enough money for retirement are also major worries shared by a large number of Britons.

Ewan Edwards, head of savings at Aldermore said: 'With inflation at a 30 year high, and energy bills predicted to increase by over 50 per cent, more households across the country will be feeling the effects on their disposable income.

'As the cost of living rises, we'd encourage people to be proactive in planning for it, so they do not feel underprepared.

'Taking positive action to review personal finances, budget, and save can make all the difference in maintaining long term financial stability.'

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